home Lifestyle There Are Simply Too Many Radioactive Boars In Fukushima, Guys

There Are Simply Too Many Radioactive Boars In Fukushima, Guys

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster has, of course, been devastating to the surrounding community, but it’s been weirdly advantageous for the surrounding wildlife — more specifically, the boars.

The wild pigs in the forests surrounding the plant have become so contaminated that their meat is inedible. Because of this, they are breeding like radioactive rabbits. How many pigs are we talking? The boar population is nearly five times larger than it was just two years ago.

In 2011, the Tōhoku earthquake caused a massive accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant. It was the largest nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

Although no one was killed during the accident, 15,894 people perished from the earthquake and the ensuing tsunami.

As is common for post-nuclear disasters, humans have stayed clear of the forests allowing the animals to breed without population control. The boars surrounding the old plant are especially benefiting from the lack of hunting.

Because their meat is now basically radioactive, the boar population has gone from 3,000 in 2014 to more than 13,000 today.

The rampant boar problem is greatly affecting the agriculture in the area. It’s been reported that the pigs have caused around $900,000 in damages.

To combat the issue, the government is encouraging widespread boar hunting. Three mass graves, dug for 600 boars each, are amazingly already full. Specially designed incinerators are available to dispose of the nuclear-contaminated bodies but they can only handle three animals a day.

This Japanese video shows the boars and other wildlife roaming free.

(via Independent)

At one point, wild boars were considered a local delicacy. Now, instead of selling them or eating them, all hunters can do is dispose of the carcasses which can be tough, considering that they weigh around 220 pounds each!

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/fukushima-boars/

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